Tag Archives for " m1a rifle "

Check Out the New M1A Stocks Collection

Hey Everyone,

I just wanted to send out a quick blog post regarding some cool M1A finds
on ebay. Ebay has a new neat little feature that allows users to create “collections”.

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Review of .308/7.62 Ammo for the M1A Rifle

What .308 Ammo to choose?

So, having been in the world of the M1A/M14, I have become kind of an ammo snob. Not necessarily out of name recognition for the manufacture, or because I think that only expensive ammo or items will do. This has come from the conclusion that I dropped a lot of money into the rifle of my dreams, and I want this rifle to function for many, many years. I would also like to have great accuracy as well, so I have conducted a test of 3 different types of ammo. I started the visit by shooting some Venezuelan surplus ammo, approximately 20 rounds. This was done to get the rifle zeroed, the barrel warm and fouled a little, in an effort to try to create a non cold barrel environment. I was shooting at a local range, 100 yards, benchrest with sandbags. There was little wind and the temp was about 70 degrees. All rounds were fired from a Springfield Armory M1A Standard 22” with Basset low rise mount, Vortex rings and Vortex Viper scope, set to X14. All shots are taken with the crosshairs set for the center of the bulls-eye.

The first being PPU PRVI Partizan Match Line 308 Winchester 168gr ammo

Ammo is manufactured with Boxer primers, making it reloadable. Found it at a local shop know for its vast reloading supplies and components. If I remember correctly, I think I paid about $15.00 for a box of 20, taking it to .75 cents a round. On inspection, the box is well made, no issues. Once open though, the flimsy holder and inner box did very little to keep the rounds separated. The rounds themselves were nice shinny with no wear or corrosion. Headstamp was legible and easy to read. Loading them into the CMI 20 round mag was flawless. I proceeded to fire 5 rounds at the target in slow succession. The first round hit about 1.5” high and 1” left, second and third hit 2” high and .75” left, fourth was a flinch/stringer hitting 1.5” high and .5” right and the last hit within the second and third grouping.

The second was Federal Sierra Gold Medal 308 168gr ammo

Ammo is made with Boxer Primers, making them reloadable. Found this ammo at the same shop as the PRVI, but was slightly more expensive at around $19.99 a box, taking it to almost a $1.00 a round. The box seemed a little sturdier then the PRVI, but the most drastic difference was in the plastic holder that held the 20 rounds. Each round was secured tightly, and the holder could be reused in the future. Just like the PRVI, the rounds, cases and headstamps are clear and legible. Each round feed easily in the CMI mags. First and second rounds hit in a nice group just 1.75” high and zeroed with no left or right drift, third round was a flinch/stringer hitting .5” high and maybe .15” left, fourth round hit slightly to the right of the first and second round group and the fifth was a flinch/stringer hitting 1.75” high but 1.25” right. Flinching sucks!!

The third was Portuguese Military Surplus 147gr

 The third was Portuguese Military Surplus 147gr, that I found locally at $100 for a sealed battle pack of 200 rounds. I bought 2 sealed packs, and I am seeking more. At just about .50 cents a round, it is great shooting ammo, clean and non-corrosive. The only complaint I have is that it was manufactured with Berdan primer, making it virtually not reloadable, but still fun to shoot. In the sealed battle pack, sealed boxes held 20 rounds with nice legible labels identifying it. The rounds were bright and shinny with no corrosion. The battle pack plastic material is great and if it is truly sealed, will keep out the unwanted efforts of time and environment. Each round loaded into the mag and off I went, but instead of only doing 5 rounds, I went shot 10 rounds in 5 shot sessions. The first shot hit at .5” high and .5” right, second hit .25” high and .10” right, third hit .10” high but 1” right and the fourth and fifth hit in a nice group just 1” high and about .75” right. No flyers, no flinches and no strings. Second session produced a nice grouping, but had a flinch/stringer. First round hit almost dead center with the vertical being dead on but .25” high, second hit 1” high but .10” left, third .5” high and .25” right, fourth was .75” high and 1” right and the fifth and final hitting .75” low and .25” right.

Some things that I gathered from these 3 different types of ammo

First is my rifle is defiantly zeroed for a light round, around 147gr. Second, my rifle holds tight groups with the slightly heavier and match grade ammo. Third, I got to work on the flinching thing. Fourth, I need to work on getting reloading equipment to cut down costs and develop a specific load that my rifle will do great with. Fifth, I need to buy more military surplus ammo as the prices have gone up about $10-$20 per 100 just within a 3 month time frame. Sixth, I need to test out more types and weights of ammo.

I love the groupings I got with the more expensive ammo, but at double the cost of the surplus stuff, it is not feasible just for range outings. Since this range test, I have taken my M14 out to 300 yards with the Portuguese ammo. It did very will, hitting almost dead center where I aimed my crosshairs at a 2’X2’ steel plate. Hits were consistent and produced that gong sound that just makes me grin ear to ear. I have also just purchased locally, 1000 rounds of some Austrian Military Surplus Hirtenberg ammo. The ammo is primarily 1980 headstamps, but has some 78 and 73 mixed in. I have yet to take any of it out for testing, but as soon as I do, I will get a review created and posted here.

My next article is going to be a step by step process on how to create a range book, with range cards, target diagrams, Mildot info and much more. Thanks for reading the article and keep shooting.

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Hog hunting with Your M1A Rifle and What You Should Know

Hog hunting can be a lot of fun if you do it right. An M1A is an ideal hunting rifle, but you have to make sure you can find hogs to shoot. You’ll need to find natural hog trails so that you can put feeders down for the hogs to find. If you put the feeders in obscure places, you’re diminishing the likelihood that you’ll get to bag a hog. Put the feeder where hogs travel. Find a trail or a wallow and that’s where you’ll need to put it.

Using hog scents is as effective as using feeders, but again you must put it where the hogs naturally travel for them to be able to find it. Choose dominant boar urine or heat scent, and be sure you’re actually putting it where hogs will naturally be near a stream, wallow or trail.

You’ll also want a good hunting light to shine on the feeder. Being able to light up the target will make all the difference in both how much enjoyment you’ll get from the hunt and how accurate your shots are.

Get yourself a good hog hunting light to hunt at night with. A good feeder light will make those late night and early evening shots much easier to make. Also, you can help attract hogs to your feeder by adding sweetness to it. Any sort of sweet, fruit-flavored powdered drink mix will work as long as you can smell it when you drop it into the feeder and it smells sweet. This tends to attract the hogs.

As far as using an M1a for hog hunting, you’ll find it’s a bit heavier than some other hunting rifles you may be used to. But the biggest factor in making sure you have a successful hog hunt with your M1A is going to be your scope. You’re going to want to be within 100 yards of the target for best results, so a scope with at least 7x magnification should be ideal. Also, the smaller the MOA the better so go with 2 over 4, for instance.

Neck and head shots are the best for bringing down a wild boar, and in order to get that precision shot you don’t want to be too far away with a poor scope. Any shot you make typically in the head and above the shoulders of the hog should be a fast, fatal shot. Otherwise, there’s the risk of only injuring the creature. Shoulder and front quarter shots are undesirable because of the animal’s tough hide and fat, and lack of vital organs. You can avoid the bad shots by making sure you have a well-secured scope and the proper setting on your sight so that you can get a good aim at whatever yardage you’re sitting away from the hog.


You also don’t want to get too close and alert your prey, because they can be dangerous. Standard .308 ammunition works well for hog hunting, if you go with the heavier bullets.

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Results For New BSA Red Dot RD30 Scope

Hey everyone!

Ok, hopefully we can find a new home for this BSA Red Dot Scope. I have randomly selected a new winner from the m1a rifles newsletter list.

The new winner of the BSA Red Dot Scope is  Alan Anderson!!

Congrats to Alan for winning a New BSA Red Dot Scope.

Alan now has 3 days to claim the prize by contacting us via our contact page or by replying to our email. If Alan does not claim the prize within 3 days we will then select another winner from the m1a rifles newsletter.

If you haven’t done so already, be sure to sign up for the m1a rifles newsletter now!

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Where to Buy the M1A Rifle Online

The Springfield Armory M1A rifle is a rifle made in the image of the M14 service rifle, which was the primary weapon used by the United States military in the late 50’s and early 60’s. The M1A should be instantly familiar to gun aficionados and war buffs, because it looks almost exactly like the M14, which was the main rife used by the United States Armed forces in the Vietnam War. The M1A was designed to capture the look and feel of the M14 for gun enthusiasts who want a high performance rifle that also has some history behind it.

It can be difficult to find an M1A rifle at a local shop, so those looking to buy one of these guns may have better luck searching online. There are a number of online gun dealers who sell M1A rifles. Be warned that because they are somewhat scarce and fairly high quality, they often carry a high price tag. This is especially true of the match variants of the M1A, which are highly accurate models designed for shooting in competitions.

Below are a few of the online dealers who sell M1A rifles:

gunbrokerGun Broker: If you haven’t visited Gun Broker before, it’s basically like an eBay for guns. Guns can be bought, sold, auctioned off, or traded through this service. Needless to say, it’s not exactly like eBay because you can’t just have a gun shipped directly to your home. In order to get an M1A rifle through Gun Broker, you must find someone who is selling one, and also find a local gun shop or someone with a federal firearms license that the gun can be shipped to.

impactgunsImpact Guns: Impact Guns is a store located in Utah that also has a nice and easy to use online store. They have several M1A rifles and M1A variants, including some of the match rifles. Prices range from just over $1,000 to over $3,000 for the higher end models. Impact Guns also sells a number of accessories and ammunition, so it can be a nice one-stop shop for your M1A needs.

ablesammogunshopAble’s Gun Shop: Able’s Gun Shop also features a number of different M1A rifles and variants. All of the M1As are frequently going out of stock, which is a testament to the popularity and power of this rifle. You may not be able to find an M1A on your first visit, but you can set up an e-mail notification that will let you know when they have the gun in stock.

thegunsourceThe Gun Source: The Gun Source offers a huge selection of M1A rifles and accessories. With all the different models available, you may have better luck finding one that isn’t on backorder. For one’s that out of stock, the site will helpfully tell you how many people are waiting in line in front of you to get the gun you want.

gundealeronlineGun Dealer Online: This site doesn’t feature quite as large of a selection as the previous three, but there are several options available, including the $3,100 Super Match model. Unfortunately, there is no way to back order an out of stock gun.

Have you used these sites before? What other would you recommend? Leave your comment below.

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The Top 3 Rifle Slings for the M1A

When hunting with an M1A, it is important to choose a rifle sling that has rubberized backing that grips your shoulder comfortably while keeping the sling in place and the rifle where you need it to be. Here is a look at three top rated rifle slings that you can use with your M1A rifle.

#1 – Butler Creek Neoprene Rifle Sling – Retails for between $11.99 and $21.99

Butler Creek Neoprene Rifle SlingThese neoprene rifle slings are equipped using comfort stretch backing, designed to reduce the weight of the rifle and to control the bounces that are typically associated with using a neoprene sling for your rifle. The comfort stretch sling is designed to combine the waterproof ability of closed-sell neoprene with comfort-stretch style backing, which reduces the weight of the M1A rifle by 50% while controlling the bounce that you may typically experience. Butler Creek also offers an Alaskan Magnum sling that is made of black neoprene and also features comfort stretch style backing, allowing the sling to give and reduce fatigue of the muscles. The design has non slip features that hold it in place nicely. There is also an Easy Rider sling by this brand that has a shark skin pad backing that is tough and rubberized and that will not slip away from your shoulder.

#2 – Quake Claw Rifle and Shotgun Sling – Retails for between $17.99 and $29.99

Quake Claw Rifle and Shotgun SlingWhen it comes to using a Quake Claw sling for your M1A rifle, you will not have to worry about hearing any sliding or squeaking. The Hush Stalker II Swivel and new design concept makes these some truly super quiet slings with non slip plastic rubber claw pads that offer a unique action for gripping so that they will stay securely on your back or shoulder. Quake Claw offers a Claw Rifle Sling, a Claw Contour Rifle Sling and also a Claw Shotgun Sling, each utilizing excellent gripping action, unique design, crack resistance and fade resistance as well, making these an excellent option for your M1A rifle sling needs.

#3 – Triple K Rifle Sling – Retails for between $17.99 and $24.99

Triple K Rifle SlingThere are two Triple K rifle slings that you can use with your M1A rifle. They are made using to quality leather materials to offer long lasting durability and strength. The first is the Basketweave Triple K Rifle Sling, which has a lining made out of suede which prevents your rifle from slipping away from your shoulder, and it is tapered from 1″ near the swivel to 2″ in thickness. The second is the Military-Style Triple K Rifle Sling, which is adjustable in an infinite number of ways. This Triple K Rifle Sling is constructed out of walnut-oil leather which offers excellent durability as well as utility.

There are many different types of rifle slings out there that are compatible with the M1A rifle, but these are certainly 3 of the best for you to consider.

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Have you tried any of these? Leave your review below!

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The Best Ammunition to Buy For Your M1A Rifle


Click to enlarge

Anyone who is serious about shooting knows that your choice of ammunition is important, whether it’s in a hunting or competition scenario. While your choice of weapon is the primary concern, ammo is definitely a factor and can make a difference in the health of a firearm and in terms of accuracy. A gun as well made as the M1A rifle deserves to have some good quality ammunition fed into it. So how do you know what type of ammo you should use with your rifle?

Well, first off you have to know what size of ammo that you need. The M1A is designed to use ammunition of 7.62x51mm NATO standard. It can also use .308 Winchester ammo, since the two types are essentially the same. Note that you should not just assume any ammo that says “7.62” is going to work for you. There are 7.62x39mm and 7.62x54mm, which are used for other types of weapons. Also, .308 magnum rounds are different from .308 Winchester, and won’t work in the M1A.

Once you’re sure you’ve got ammo that will work with you M1A, then you need to figure out what you’re going to be using the weapon for. If you’re just going to the firing range to unload some rounds, then you’re probably not overly concerned about pinpoint accuracy. However, if you’re going hunting for small game or you’re target shooting in a competition setting, then you may want some top-quality ammo that will give you better accuracy.

When accuracy is the concern, then you have to consider the grain of the bullet. Grain is a type of measurement used for bullets. The larger the grain, the heavier the bullet is. Bullets that are too light are more susceptible to factors such as wind, while bullets that are too heavy are pulled more by gravity, and will be pulled to the ground faster. The M1A can use any grain from 147 to 180.

It’s not a huge issue for relatively short-range shooting or shooting at large targets; so casual shooters can safely ignore grain as long as they’re within the right range. For tournament level shooters, Springfield Armory recommends 168-grain bullets manufactured by a match grade ammo company. 168-grain is also recommend for deer hunting, but a larger grain is better for bigger game, such as moose.

Another consideration is the actual type of bullet casing. Hollow point rounds are known for their improved accuracy, and many hunters also recommend them because they can cause quick and humane kills. The other common option is full metal jacket ammunition, the main advantage of which is that it has less chance of misfiring. The relatively new ballistic tip ammo attempts to combine the advantages of both, but is more expensive.

Finally, for the health of your firearm, it’s important not to use soft-tipped bullets. The problem is that the soft parts get shaved off the bullets and end up in the gun’s inner workings, and this can then jam up the whole gun. Stick to using bullets that are standard full metal jacket, hollow point, or ballistic tip.

  • Any grain from 147 to 180 is usable.
  • 168 grain is recommended for best accuracy
  • Use FMJ, HP, or “ballistic tip” type rounds (Hsoi: i.e. plastic tiped bullets; note that the term “Ballistic Tip” is a registered trademark of Nosler, so it shouldn’t be used as a generic term for “plastic tipped” bullets)
  • Avoid soft points. The lead can shave and wind up down in the action and jam it up.
  • Avoid steel-cased ammo (not necessarily SAAMI spec)
  • Avoid Hornady TAP (not sure why this)
  • Avoid Cavim ammo as it’s not very accurate and varies in size

For hunting

  • Winchester Silver Tip is OK to use (I’m not sure if they differentiate between Winchester Super-X Silvertip and Winchester Supreme Ballistic Silvertip, and/or if it matters. The Silvertip is an aluminum cap whereas the Ballstic Silvertip is a polycarbonate tip. Don’t know if it matters, and it probably doesn’t.)
  • Hornady Ballistic Tip (technically Nosler makes Ballistic Tip, as it’s their registered trademark. Are they meaning A-Max or V-Max? I don’t know, but you get the idea.)
  • Winchester Failsafe (Winchester doesn’t make this any more, replacing with the XP3 line.)
  • 168 grain for deer
  • 175 grain for moose
  • Moly coated bullets are OK to use but when you start to use them you must stay with them. You will have to clean the gas port more often. SAI does not recommend. If you do use them, it will gum up fast, and you’ll have to clean often and clean well.
  • Tracer and armor piercing ammo is OK, as long as it’s NATO spec.
  • Frangible ammo is too light, won’t work.

There’s a few other things in the posting, but it’s a bit redundant. Their terms are a bit informal so it’s difficult to know exactly what’s what, especially regarding hunting ammo. The key thing seems to be that you can NOT use anything with an exposed soft point. The reason is any exposed lead will shave off, get down into the action, and jam things up. I have read of people using exposed soft points in their M1A’s “without any problem” but why risk any problems?

So, what’s on your mind? Have something to add? Feel free to comment below!

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Why you WANT the JAE-100 G2 Rifle Stock for your M1A


The first thing that should make you want the JAE-100 is the material that it is made of.  When you take a look at the materials that went into making this particular rifle stock, what you will see is complete metal.  All kinds of the most durable metallic alloys around were used in the manufacture of this rifle stock.  That not only makes it a better complimentary fit to your M1A if it was constructed standard, but it also means that you don’t have to worry about the stock succumbing to wear and tear anytime soon.  Those are both huge advantages to choosing this particular rifle stock product.

Good Fit

Unfortunately, one of the major drawbacks to a lot of these rifle stock manufacturers is that they are not too picky about ensuring a perfect fit for their rifle stock.  You should be especially suspicious of any that claim that they have the ability to fit multiple rifles from different manufacturers.

This is not true of the JAE-100 G2 however, as it claims to be made specifically for the M1A rifle.  Some of the more ambitious sellers might claim that M14 style rifles are all good, but at its heart this rifle stock is definitely for the M1A.  That should increase overall functionality as well as make it easy to troubleshoot any problems that might arise.  Overall, a good fit is just better for these and other obvious reasons.


At the same time that the M1A is the perfect rifle for this rifle stock, you will realize pretty soon after purchasing it that the JAE-100 is fully adjustable.  Adjusting the rifle stock is a simple matter of manipulating the interface so that you can get it to fit on your M1A rifle exactly how you would like it to be.  The adjustability is also probably what allows some to claim that it can fit all M14 style rifles.  We cannot comment on that particular attribute, but we can confirm that this rifle stock fits the M1A like a comfortable glove.


The overall cost of this rifle stock will be in the $900 to $1000 range.  This is not cheap in the general sense, but it is definitely cheap for rifle stocks created from Aluminum and Titanium that also have the list of features and advantages listed above.  In fact, many rifle accessory sales will allow you to get the JAE-100 for $900 nowadays and at that price this stock is most definitely an absolute steal.


One last reason why you want the JAE-100 has to be its ability to continually deliver the same level of high performance again and again.  Any rifle stock can be attached and immediately proxy for a bolt in terms of its performance, but over time many of them tend to decay.  This is not good.  However, the JAE-100 is different.  You will be able to rely on it for years, making it easily one of the best investments you could make for your rifle.

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What is an M1A Rifle

The M1A rifle is one of the various types of rifles that you can purchase for your own use. There are various aspects of this rifle that could make it the best rifle for your own needs. With that being said, the M1A rifle could also be the wrong rifle for what you need it for. Taking a look into exactly what the M1A rifle is will help you to understand as much as possible about what the rifle can do for you.

The M1A rifle is actually a different version of a Military rifle that was created for the United States. This rifle is known as the M14, and was created by the exact same company. There is actually a drastic difference between the two. The military rifle was created under specific specifications by the US government. This means that the rifle was built to be able to handle serious combat. The guns were made to be able to handle more, and are therefore more expensive than the M1A.

The M1A rifle is a semi-automatic weapon. While many people want to attempt to turn it into an automatic weapon, it cannot be. It cannot be modified into an automatic. Beware of anyone trying to tell you that an M1A is an automatic; the gun is not very stable with an automatic setting. Even if someone managed to modify it to be automatic, it would not be a good rifle to have or shoot with.

The major company creating the M1A rifle is the Springfield Armory, Inc. While there are other companies creating the rifle, this was the original. Fulton Armory also builds a rifle resembling the M1A. While there are specific types of international M1A rifles floating around, they can no longer be imported into the US.

There are various accessories that can be added to the M1A rifle. Each accessory can add something to the rifle, but could change the way it behaves or feels. Test out various accessories before decided on the one to use.

In the United States, the M1A rifle must be registered with the government. The National Firearms Act actually requires the regulation of the M1A Rifle. Because of varying gun laws by state, there are differences between states. Some states will require that you have a permit to be able to purchase the M1A rifle. Other states simply state that you must register the firearm after you purchase it. Each state may be different. Check your local laws to fully understand how you can legally own a M1A Rifle.

The M1A rifle has seen popularity grow steadily, simply because it is known to be a good rifle. While it cannot fit all needs, it fits a myriad of needs that people may have. That alone makes it important to research and consider the M1A Rifle for your own personal needs. While it may not be perfect, it can help you to understand exactly what you need, and if it is the right rifle for you.

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Myths Surrounding the M1A Rifle

The M1A Rifle is a popular rifle that many use on a regular basis.

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What You Should Know About The M1A Rifle

You may be like other people and think that the M1A rifle is the same as the military version the M14. Although they are both very similar, they are indeed two different rifles.

The M1A is an available to the public version of the military’s M14 rifle. Both of these rifles are highly regarded and very hard to come by. If you do find one it is likely to cost thousands of dollars, with the M14 costing several thousand dollars more than the M1A.

What is the difference?

Although people find it hard to believe that the M14 rifle and the M1A rifle are not one in the same, the truth is that they are not. There are several differences between the two rifles.

The M14 receivers were made using a drop forge process, and the M1A is not. This fact in itself makes the M14 a more expensively made rifle.

The selector switch on the M1A is also different from that of the M14.

Many of the internal mechanisms are completely different as well. They even come apart a bit differently.

Where you can buy a M1A rifle

Although the M14 rifle is expensive and very hard to come by, the M1A can be found for no more than a couple thousand. This price is not exactly inexpensive, but compared to the price of the M14 it is reasonable.

The M1A rifle is manufactured in Illinois and can be purchased at the Springfield armory. The armory offers a wide variety of supplies to go with your M1A rifle. Some of these supplies are very beneficial to you and some of the accessories are not really necessary. You will just have to go by your individual needs.

  • Bipods: These attach to the M1A and help in the prevention of recoil. The bipods are made of heat treated steel and have a black anodized finish.

  • Slings: Rifle slings are handy when you find yourself walking a long distance. They will allow you to keep your hands free and hang your rifle from your shoulder.

  • Cheek pads: These pads are a great way to protect your shoulder and cheek from friction that might be caused while you are shooting your rifle.

  • Ammo pouch: These are very handy when it comes to keeping your ammo in one place and handy.

  • Scopes: There are several scopes that are available for your M1A rifle. Some of these would include Burris Scopes, Bushnell Scopes, Night force Scopes, and Nikon Scopes.

One of the most important things to mention when you are handling any type of firearms is to practice extreme care and safety. Firearms can be perfectly safe as long as they are handled properly and with great care. Never take any unnecessary risks when handling any firearm.

There is no doubt that the M1A rifle is a magnificent piece of artillery. If has great range and a lot of power all of which make this weapon the perfect rifle.

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Recent Winner of the M1ARifles.com Free Rifle Scope Contest

The-Nikon-4.5-14X40-Buckmasters--I-won-on-M1A-RiflesCongrats to Hollister Delong, the recent winner of the M1ARifles.com free rifle scope contest. Here is a picture of Hollister and his new FREE Nikon Buckmasters 4.5-14×40 SF Rifle Scope.

Hollister won this contest by being the top forum poster in our M1A Forum. He provided our forum members top quality advice and by having the most posts in the forum.  So once again hollister congratulations.

I also wanted to let everyone know that each month will be a new contest and new prize for my newsletter subscribers. So make sure you sign up for the M1A Rifles newsletter for exclusive deals, informaion, and monthly prizes. Sign up NOW!!

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Facts About M1A Rifles

The M1A rifle, although very similar to the military’s M14, is a magnificent piece of artillery that is manufactured and sold in Illinois.

M1A rifles are one of the most precise rifles for reaching your target. The scopes have an accuracy that makes it nearly impossible to miss a target. That is why this rifle is commonly used by military and police snipers.


The specifications of the M1A are as follows:

Magazine capacity: The capacity of this M1A rifles magazine is 5 rounds, 10 rounds, and 20 rounds.

The Finish: This rifle’s finish is made of a flat black oxide. This color is made flat so that it does not reflect in any sort of light. A fact that may be particularly handy if a soldier or policeman were trying to remain secluded from view.

Caliber: The caliber of the M1A rifles is .308.

Stock: The stock of this amazing rifle is made of an oil finished walnut.

Safety: The safety is mounted manually in front of the trigger guard.

Barrel: The barrel of the M1A rifle is around 22-23 inches long. If you were to add a flash suppressor it would increase the length to about 25 inches.

Sights: The sights of this rifle are click adjusted rear.

Weight: The weight of this rifle will be dependent on whether or not it is loaded or empty. In general, the weight is around 9 pounds.

Operation: The M1A is operated by gas.

Manufacturer: The Manufacturer is Springfield Inc. in Geneseo, IL.

The M1A is often mistaken for being the M14, but in reality it is the civilian replica. The M14 is a high powered rifle that has been used by the military for many years. The M1A is also used by the military, but it is not exclusive to the military.


Although the M1A rifles are highly accurate, there are many ways in which you can modify the use of the gun in order to make it more precise.

  • Checking for parallel in the rod guide can actually improve your precision and accuracy.

  • Putting padding on the hand guard can improve accuracy.

  • Adjusting the flash suppressor will improve your precision immensely

The accuracy of the M1A rifles has been utilized both by soldiers and by police trainees. It is helpful in target practice and sniper training since it has a precision that can’t be matched.

The M1A used to have a bayonet lug attached to it, but that practice has ceased since the year 1994 when it was passed that there would be no more assault weapons. However, in the year 2004 the ban was removed making it alright to attach the lugs once more.

No matter what your reasons are for acquiring and admiring M1A rifles, there will be no doubt in your mind that it is indeed an amazing piece of machinery. It may not be exactly the same as the M14, but it is a king of weapons in its own right.

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Safety while handling the M1A Rifle

The M1A rifle is the commercially available version of the United States army M14 military semi automatic machine gun. It is a very powerful weapon with a decent range of approximately 500 yards. These rifles are highly sought after and a well maintained model can be purchased for anywhere upwards of $10,000.

Considering the capacity of the weapon, it demands to be respected and you should be safe while using and maintaining it at all times. There are a couple of key points that you need to keep in mind while handling these machines.

The first instruction that you need to follow is regarding the operating rod handle. Whenever you attempt to manipulate the operating rod handle with a chamber, please keep in mind to move your hand out of the way of the rod after releasing it. Ensure that your fingers are always out of the path of the operating rod. The force of the operating rod is powerful to severe your fingers and open up your palm. That is definitely an ugly sight and something you should avoid at all costs.

Whenever you are operating on any firearm, be sure to wear safety glasses at all times, especially while disassembling it. The M1A’s operating rod is maintained under immense pressure and upon releasing of the connector locks, the rod guide might plummet out at a high velocity if your other hand is not fastened steadily enough. Make sure that other individuals in the room are wearing safety equipment as well.

If for some reason the weapon does not react when you pull the trigger, resist the temptation to pull back the operating handle. Keep the weapon pointed downwards for at least fifteen seconds to rule out the foul play due to a delayed ignition. Before pulling the operating handle back, remove the magazine, then pull the operating handle and check if the rifle is jammed. If the rifle is jammed, use a rubber tipped hammer to hit the operating rod handle downward, keeping your body as clear as possible from the weapon.

Although it may sound stupid, it is important that you verify the kind of ammunition before loading the weapon. You should ideally verify several times just to be sure. The M1A uses a 7.62x51mm NATO, so repeat those exact words when you are purchasing the ammunition. Always buy from known sources and do not risk the weapon and your life for a good deal. Make sure that you have already seen the ammunition for real and that it is the exact same one that you are replacing with. Most of the NATO bullets have known markings that are not very hard to figure out. The wrong weapon might cause the weapon to implode, severely hurting you in the process.

With all the right measures, you should have a long and enjoyable time with your M1A. Most M1A owners are very proud of their weapon and take great care in looking after it. Always read the manual thoroughly, no matter how good you think you are. The manual is written for a reason and the manufacturer wants to make sure that you stay fit and healthy for a long time and purchase more of their weapons!

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Differentiating an M1A Rifle from an M14 Rifle


M1A Rifle - Click to enlarge

The first thing that you might notice about these two rifles is the striking similarity in appearance. It should be similar because they are essentially the same in almost every feature except that one rifle is used by the army and the other one can be purchased at any reputed gun store.

Like the saying goes, the differences are only skin deep. For beginners, the receivers of the M14 are manufactured using what is known as the drop-forge technique. M1A on the other hand uses an investment cast receiver and may be comprised of a mixture of genuine United States GI military specification parts along with case replica parts, or simply all United States GI parts or even mostly investment cast parts along with smaller military specification parts. The sound created by the two receivers is different and any rifle audiophile can immediately differentiate the two by simply listening to their sound upon discharge.

The selector switch of M1As manufactured post 1990 are different from the ones on the M14. The M14 uses a walnut stock similar to the M21 that is height adjustable. Additionally, the 7.62mm caliber design was also dropped after the 1990 model of the M1A. M1As work only off 7.62x50mm NATO ammunition and not on anything else.

The bayonet lug has been removed from the newer M1A models. This was following the Assaults Weapons Ban of 1994 that prohibited the use of bayonet lugs on civilian weaponry. However, there is a workaround that allows owners to attached a bayonet lug to their M1As since the flash suppressor on the M1As are all identical.

When it comes to disassembly as well, there are minor differences between the two. With the M14, you can simply remove the connector and the operating rod slides out whereas the M1A uses a technique commonly known as “twist and pray” to remove the operating rod.

M14 Rifle With Fire Selector - Click to enlarge

M14 Rifle With Fire Selector - Click to enlarge

The M1A is strictly a semi automatic rifle. There is no way that it can be made to operate in a full automatic mode. The M14, on the other hand, is a selective fire military weapon. This translates into it being able to operate in selective automatic fire mode. The military initially hadthe selector switch to operate the M14 in full auto but eventually had it removed to a functionless knob since most of the soldiers were habitually leaving the selector to auto under all conditions. The M14 was infamous for not being very controllable in the auto mode and hence it was decided to drop the switch after a while. Thus, this is the reason why almost 90% of the M14s out there are forcibly semi auto with no option to switch.

The other big difference between the two weapons is the inflated price tag. The M14 is at least $14,000 dearer than the M1A. The high cost is attributed to the costlier fabrication process and the use of costlier military grade materials while making it. Hence, you need to be cautious and use discretion while handling the M14, especially if it is in the auto mode.

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The M1A Forum Is Now Live!

m1aforum-250The M1A Forum is now live! This is a project that I have been wanting to start for a while now. Well, I’ve finally taken action and implemented a forum for the M1A rifle community. I’ve been wanting to do this for about 4 or 5 months now. I’m excited to see what will become of the M1A Forum in the near future.

The forum is an outlet for M1A rifle owners and future owners to browse, post video and pictures of their rifles, give advice and learn. Head over to the M1A forum and register now!

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