How To Remove The VLTOR Rail Cluster From A M1A Socom II

June 6, 2011 by  
Filed under M1A Socom

INSTRUCTIONS ON REMOVING THE VLTOR RAIL CLUSTER FROM A SPRINGFIELD ARMORY SOCOM II

Hello to all of my fellow SOCOM II owners!  I am pleased to bring you a detailed description on how to remove the VLTOR Cluster Rail from your rifle in a few easy steps. From installing a mod-stock, to simply not having a use for your rails any longer, I will have you ready for whatever plans you have in store for your SOCOM II.

The VLTOR cluster rail removes easily and only requires a few minutes of your time and some very basic tools.  Here is what you will need:

1.)   One 5/32 Allen Key

2.)   One standard size socket wrench with a 3/8” socket attached

3.)   About 10 minutes of time to remove rails

4.)   A small amount of elbow grease

Step One

Locate the two 3/8” bolts on the left side of your SOCOM that attach the rear of the rail to the receiver.  Set your socket wrench to remove the bolts and begin turning them counter clockwise.  My bolts were set very tight and required a little assistance from my wife.  While my wife tightly held the rifle in place, I removed the bolts which eventually broke free and were unscrewed the rest of the way by hand.  The two bolts have washers attached, so be careful not to lose them.

 

Step Two:

Remove the lower portion of your rail cluster from the upper rail assembly.  This is easily done by simply depressing both of the rail locking tabs located on both sides of the lower rail attachment.  Push them in at the same time and simply pull the lower rail away from the upper rail assembly.

Step 3:

Now you have to remove the receiver/barrel from the stock.  This has to be done in order to reach the Allen bolts that secure the upper rail assembly to the barrel.  First start of by removing your trigger group.  This is done by simply pulling out and upward on your trigger guard.  Once the trigger guard is fully opened, remove the trigger group by pulling straight up.  After removing the trigger assembly, the stock should simply lift off of the receiver.  However, my rifle’s stock was very, VERY tight around the receiver and required a little bit of elbow grease.  This is most easily achieved by pulling up on the rear portion of the stock, whilst pulling it towards you to clear the lip that holds the stock ferrule.  Once the stock is off, we move on to the next step.

Step 4:

Now we move on to the actual removal of the upper rail assembly from the barrel.  This is very, very simple.  You will now need to use your 5/32 Allen key.  You will see a large rounded band that curves around the barrel, with two Allen screws on either side.  This is what secured the upper rail assembly to the barrel.  Insert your Allen key and turn counter clock-wise, loosening and eventually removing both screws.  After you have removed both screws, push firmly against the band to loosen it from the rail.  Once it breaks free it should come right out.  Now is the most gratifying step.  Pull the upper rail assembly away from receiver and barrel.  It should come off with little or no effort.

Step 5:

My suggestion at this point is to re-attach all bolts, screws and hardware back onto the rail cluster.  This will prevent you from losing any hardware, should you ever decide to re-install or sell your rail cluster.   It should be noted that there is one piece that is particularly important on the rail cluster that will fall out if not secured back in by the original 3/8” bolt that you removed in the beginning (see photos).  This piece holds the rail tight against the hand-guard clip slot, used to secure the standard rails to the barrel.

Closing:

Now that you are all finished removing the rail cluster, re-assemble your rifle the same way you disassembled it, just perform all actions in reverse(if that makes sense – lol).  Now you are ready to put on that scout rail and hand-guard that has been patiently waiting to be installed…or maybe a new mod-stock?  Whatever you plan to do, do it safely and enjoy that M1A!!!!!

M1A Video: How to White Letter Your Guns

November 12, 2010 by  
Filed under M1A Rifles

M1ARifles.com member Sappnasty shows us how to white letter our guns, mags and accessories. Check out the video below.

Materials needed

  1. China White marker
  2. Rubbing Alcohol
  3. Clean cloth
  4. Q-tips

Did you like the video? Have something to add or comment? Leave your thoughts below.

Review of .308/7.62 Ammo for the M1A Rifle

November 1, 2010 by  
Filed under Reviews

What .308 Ammo to choose?

So, having been in the world of the M1A/M14, I have become kind of an ammo snob. Not necessarily out of name recognition for the manufacture, or because I think that only expensive ammo or items will do. This has come from the conclusion that I dropped a lot of money into the rifle of my dreams, and I want this rifle to function for many, many years. I would also like to have great accuracy as well, so I have conducted a test of 3 different types of ammo. I started the visit by shooting some Venezuelan surplus ammo, approximately 20 rounds. This was done to get the rifle zeroed, the barrel warm and fouled a little, in an effort to try to create a non cold barrel environment. I was shooting at a local range, 100 yards, benchrest with sandbags. There was little wind and the temp was about 70 degrees. All rounds were fired from a Springfield Armory M1A Standard 22” with Basset low rise mount, Vortex rings and Vortex Viper scope, set to X14. All shots are taken with the crosshairs set for the center of the bulls-eye.

The first being PPU PRVI Partizan Match Line 308 Winchester 168gr ammo

Ammo is manufactured with Boxer primers, making it reloadable. Found it at a local shop know for its vast reloading supplies and components. If I remember correctly, I think I paid about $15.00 for a box of 20, taking it to .75 cents a round. On inspection, the box is well made, no issues. Once open though, the flimsy holder and inner box did very little to keep the rounds separated. The rounds themselves were nice shinny with no wear or corrosion. Headstamp was legible and easy to read. Loading them into the CMI 20 round mag was flawless. I proceeded to fire 5 rounds at the target in slow succession. The first round hit about 1.5” high and 1” left, second and third hit 2” high and .75” left, fourth was a flinch/stringer hitting 1.5” high and .5” right and the last hit within the second and third grouping.

The second was Federal Sierra Gold Medal 308 168gr ammo

Ammo is made with Boxer Primers, making them reloadable. Found this ammo at the same shop as the PRVI, but was slightly more expensive at around $19.99 a box, taking it to almost a $1.00 a round. The box seemed a little sturdier then the PRVI, but the most drastic difference was in the plastic holder that held the 20 rounds. Each round was secured tightly, and the holder could be reused in the future. Just like the PRVI, the rounds, cases and headstamps are clear and legible. Each round feed easily in the CMI mags. First and second rounds hit in a nice group just 1.75” high and zeroed with no left or right drift, third round was a flinch/stringer hitting .5” high and maybe .15” left, fourth round hit slightly to the right of the first and second round group and the fifth was a flinch/stringer hitting 1.75” high but 1.25” right. Flinching sucks!!

The third was Portuguese Military Surplus 147gr

 The third was Portuguese Military Surplus 147gr, that I found locally at $100 for a sealed battle pack of 200 rounds. I bought 2 sealed packs, and I am seeking more. At just about .50 cents a round, it is great shooting ammo, clean and non-corrosive. The only complaint I have is that it was manufactured with Berdan primer, making it virtually not reloadable, but still fun to shoot. In the sealed battle pack, sealed boxes held 20 rounds with nice legible labels identifying it. The rounds were bright and shinny with no corrosion. The battle pack plastic material is great and if it is truly sealed, will keep out the unwanted efforts of time and environment. Each round loaded into the mag and off I went, but instead of only doing 5 rounds, I went shot 10 rounds in 5 shot sessions. The first shot hit at .5” high and .5” right, second hit .25” high and .10” right, third hit .10” high but 1” right and the fourth and fifth hit in a nice group just 1” high and about .75” right. No flyers, no flinches and no strings. Second session produced a nice grouping, but had a flinch/stringer. First round hit almost dead center with the vertical being dead on but .25” high, second hit 1” high but .10” left, third .5” high and .25” right, fourth was .75” high and 1” right and the fifth and final hitting .75” low and .25” right.

Some things that I gathered from these 3 different types of ammo

First is my rifle is defiantly zeroed for a light round, around 147gr. Second, my rifle holds tight groups with the slightly heavier and match grade ammo. Third, I got to work on the flinching thing. Fourth, I need to work on getting reloading equipment to cut down costs and develop a specific load that my rifle will do great with. Fifth, I need to buy more military surplus ammo as the prices have gone up about $10-$20 per 100 just within a 3 month time frame. Sixth, I need to test out more types and weights of ammo.

I love the groupings I got with the more expensive ammo, but at double the cost of the surplus stuff, it is not feasible just for range outings. Since this range test, I have taken my M14 out to 300 yards with the Portuguese ammo. It did very will, hitting almost dead center where I aimed my crosshairs at a 2’X2’ steel plate. Hits were consistent and produced that gong sound that just makes me grin ear to ear. I have also just purchased locally, 1000 rounds of some Austrian Military Surplus Hirtenberg ammo. The ammo is primarily 1980 headstamps, but has some 78 and 73 mixed in. I have yet to take any of it out for testing, but as soon as I do, I will get a review created and posted here.

My next article is going to be a step by step process on how to create a range book, with range cards, target diagrams, Mildot info and much more. Thanks for reading the article and keep shooting.

M1A Review: Review of the Bassett Machines High Picatinny M1A Scope Mount

July 30, 2010 by  
Filed under Reviews

bassett m1a rifle scope mount

bassett m1a rifle scope mount

First off, let me introduce myself. I am Kyle. I am a USAF veteran, was in Law Enforcement in AZ for about 3 years and have since returned to the Telecommunications Industry. I am, at heart a technician. In the USAF I was a Telecom Tech, but I was also a Security Forces Extra. I was basically an extra base cop during exercises and so on. At every qualification, I obtained “Expert Marksman”. In the AZ Academy I placed second (using a Glock 22 in 40SW), with first going to an officer using a 9mm. I grew up around firearms, ranging from 22s to 30-06 and everything in between. I am an owner of a new Springfield Standard M1A 22” in the Walnut stock. I take great care in researching and learning every firearm I have ever owned, with the M1A being no exception.

I researched the M1A for 4 months before getting mine. In those 4 months, 3 months were spent researching scopes and mounts. Lets start with m1a scope mounts. As anyone knows, the mounts for the M1A are vast and really do not sell for under $100, with the top end at $400. I don’t know what some peoples budgets are, but mine was differently not at the $400 range for a mount. Through my research I discovered Bassett Machine, located in Dripping Springs Texas. Their website is really easy to navigate, and I found the mount subsection. They show 2 different styles of m1a scope mounts. One being the “Standard”, in two variants, the second being the “Picatinny” style in two variants. Being a modular kind of guy, I chose to start with the Picatinny style.

Bassett offers a “high” and “low” rail. Both being around the $150 range, now we are talking. I also wanted a mount that would not need to be removed to use the iron sights, I am a big believer in backup plans and options. My wants lead me to the “high” rail style, with the people at Bassett confirming that if the “high” rail is mounted on a SAI M1A, there would be clearance to use the iron sights without removing the mount or scope. From what I was able to also find, is that depending on if the receiver is of different manufactures, that the “low” rail could work, but it was a case by case basis. From the photos on the internet, the Bassett mount seemed very straight forward. It had a single bolt to attach to the rifle, with no other anchors. This intrigued and worried me, as I am a big backup kind of guy. I also had researched that SAI also had a single point mount, which received constant bad reviews. So, my research brought me to the reviews of the Bassett mount. I searched for about a month, looking specifically for reviews, and found nothing bad, only great comments and experiences.

bassett m1a scope mounted

bassett m1a scope mounted

Bassett Machine also had the instructions on how to install the mount on their website. It is very straight forward, hold mount in your hand, mate it to the left side of the M1A receiver, hand tighten the single bolt to the threading and use the included tool to torque the bolt to the machined specs. Ok, so now what was this “tool” they spoke of. Well, during the development of the mount, they discovered that the mount needed to be torque to 22lbs. Well, if I am out at the range or in the field, I will bet I do not carry a torque wrench. They thought of this as well and found that by using the weight of the rifle, and using a small piece of metal attached to the bolt, it would not only create the correct torque for installation, if using the tool every time, the mount would return within ½ moa after removal. The ring mounting area is designed to accept Weaver and Picatinny rings. This is important when putting together an optics package.

While Picatinny rings are great, they are often more expensive then their counterpart the Weaver rings. Both mount use claws and tension for mounting, but the difference is in the angles of the anchor points. Well, looks like Bassett thought of everything. Also, with any other mounts, there is no need to remove the strip clip guide of tighten down 3 or 4 allen head bolts with a tiny allen wrench. I like not having to remove factory items to add to something.

Well, with the price, ease of installation, included tool and great reviews, the purchase was made. I received my new M1A scope mount about 4 days after my web purchase. Out of the packaging it looks and feels rock solid. I have held many of mounts, with the UTG brand mounts feeling rather flimsy and was surprised with it in my hands. It included instructions with pictures and the special tool. Installation was a snap, and using the tool was a dream. First range trip out, it help up the Venezuelan and Argentine Surplus ammo, about 500 rounds and no movement. I was able to first sight the irons in, without removal of the mount or scope then moved to the scope. For the price and the final product, I am very very happy with the Bassett High Rail M1A Scope Mount and would recommend to anyone.

M1A Scope Mounts on Ebay

Springfield Armory 3rd Gen M1A Rifle Scope Mount
Springfield Armory 3rd Gen M1A Rifle Scope Mount
$119.00
Time Remaining: 2d 19h 42m

Armory  .308OEMsocom16M14M1A Aluminum Scope Mount New Generation Black
Armory .308OEMsocom16M14M1A Aluminum Scope Mount New Generation Black
$49.88
Time Remaining: 5d 8h 42m
Buy It Now for only: $49.88

Armory .308OEMsocom16M14M1A Aluminum Scope Mount
Armory .308OEMsocom16M14M1A Aluminum Scope Mount
$49.88
Time Remaining: 25d 21h 20m
Buy It Now for only: $49.88

Get Paid to blog here on M1ARifles.com!

June 6, 2010 by  
Filed under M1A Rifles

Yup, it's true. I'm paying for your experience and opinions about the M1A/M14 rifle.

I'm using my GI bill to go to school and my m1arifles.com blog is slowing down as far as content goes. That's why I'm offering to pay for your M1A/M14 experience and opinions.

I'm willing to pay the following prices for content:

* A single 300-500 word article - $25 ($30 with pictures)
* A single video review or "how to" - $50
* Combination of both video and content - $75

The content could be anything related to the M1A rifle like accessory reviews, m1a history, product reviews, "how to" (ex. "how to disassemble your m1a rifle") new rifle/gun laws, marksmanship, or any other idea you might have.

Your name will be kept as the author on your content, however, you must agree to ONLY publish the content on m1arifles.com. You can't publish it elsewhere. This is to protect m1arifles.com with Google's terms of service regulations.

If you are interested, use the contact form here http://www.m1arifles.com/contact-us/ and send me your ideas for content. If I approve, I will give you the go ahead and wait for the content. Also, respond here in this thread and let me know if you would be interested.

**I will make payments to you via paypal, make sure you have an account, IT'S FREE.**

I look forward to your replies. Comment below

Jerry

Admin

www.m1arifles.com

Another M1A Contest: Win a New Burris FastFire II Red Dot Sight

February 8, 2010 by  
Filed under M1A Rifles

That's right! M1a Rifles is throwing another contest with a sweet prize. Don't miss out on this opportunity to win a New Burris FastFire II Red Dot Sight with Mount.

It's time to make the m1a forum hyper active again and this contest will do just that. So head over to this post to read the forum contest rules.

M1A Deal Of The Day: Springfield M1A Fiberglass Rifle Stock With Recoil Pad

February 4, 2010 by  
Filed under M1A Rifles

M1A Deal of the day is something that I will implement from now on here on M1ARifles.com. I will find the hottest M1A Rifle related deals on the net. These deals will be sourced from various sites like ebay, amazon, gun broker and more. All will be related to the M14/M1A. Items to be included will be M1A rifle stocks, slings, rifle scopes, rangefinders, cheek pads, bipods and more.

M1A Deal Of The Day: Springfield M1A Fiberglass Rifle Stock With Recoil Pad

I was browsing through ebay and found this beauty. A Springfield M1A Fiberglass Rifle Stock With Recoil Pad. Here is what the description has to say about this m1a stock.

Up for auction is a rifle stock for the Springfield Armory M1A sporting rifle a rifle that is legally sold in all 50 states and is not a banned rifle under e bay guidelines.

This stock was taken off a new rifle the owner went with a McMillan stock and did not want this.

It has the factory recoil pad and is black it has checkering on the rear and forearm area unlike the USGI issue Viet Nam fiberglass stocks.

Both sling swivels are included and this does not require the metal liner as does the wood stock.

No foreign sales please do not ask.

Thanks for looking and good luck bidders

m1a fiberglass rifle stock

Click Here to go to auction

The Bidding Started at $0.01

and is currently at only $10.50 with 2 bids. Hurry and jump on it before someone else runs away with this steal of a deal!

Click here to be taken to the auction.

Shooting 1000 Yards with your M1A Rifle: What You Should Know

December 30, 2009 by  
Filed under M1A Rifles

The M1A rifle is not an inexpensive rifle—the standard model typically costs between $1000 and $1800. So, understandably, people who purchase it want to know if it is reliable and effective. They also want to know how it performs at shooting 1000 yards. Can the M1A rifle shoot 1000 yards, as some people say—or is this just nonsense? Read on to find out.

Background of the M1A

The M1A is actually a high-quality reproduction of the United States M14 rifle that was used during the early years of the Vietnam War. Actually the M14 rifle is still being used in some branches of the U.S. Army, Navy, and Marines. Some countries around the world use variations of the M14 as well. So, this should indicate just how reliable and useful the M1A rifle is.

The M1A is classified as an assault weapon if it is equipped with a pistol grip or flash suppressor in many states. In those states, people can get a legal muzzle brake for the rifle. It would be wise for anyone to check local laws before purchasing this rifle.

Shooting 1000 Yards with the M1A

It is definitely possible to shoot 1000 yards with this rifle—no nonsense here. However, it is not simple to do. Anyone—even the most experienced rifle shooter—is likely to have trouble starting out. After all, take a look at any 1000 yard high-power match and you will see that there are very few service rifle entries. And, the people who have entered with service rifles are typically from the military. But this simply points to the fact that the M1A can (and does) shoot 1000 in experienced hands. Why? Well, the military entries in the high-power matches are using the M14 rifles—and these are like the very close relatives of the M1A’s.

Tips on Shooting 1000 Yards

You really need a lot of practice with your M1A in order to be able to shoot 1000 yards, of course. However, there are a few tricks you can try in order to boost your odds of succeeding. Give these tips a try:

  • Choose the right bullets. For long-range shooting, you need bullets with the highest ballistic coefficient (BC).

  • Try a steady prone position. While this doesn’t work for every shooter (bench shooters), many people still use the prone position for an accurate shot —which, therefore, helps to get their bullets to go further.

  • Get a rifle scope. Try buying a M1A rifle scope that is sealed, waterproof, and fog proof. This might help you to get better precision in your aiming, which could help with your distance.

When all is said and done, it all comes down to this—you are going to need to practice. The accuracy and shooting potential of the M1A is exceptional, but only if you put in the time and effort. And, yes, this rifle is definitely dependable and worth the cost. It is excellent at shooting targets, of course, but it can also be put to work for hunting and for tactical uses.

Hog hunting with Your M1A Rifle and What You Should Know

November 25, 2009 by  
Filed under M1A Rifles

Hog hunting can be a lot of fun if you do it right. An M1A is an ideal hunting rifle, but you have to make sure you can find hogs to shoot. You'll need to find natural hog trails so that you can put feeders down for the hogs to find. If you put the feeders in obscure places, you're diminishing the likelihood that you'll get to bag a hog. Put the feeder where hogs travel. Find a trail or a wallow and that’s where you'll need to put it.

Using hog scents is as effective as using feeders, but again you must put it where the hogs naturally travel for them to be able to find it. Choose dominant boar urine or heat scent, and be sure you're actually putting it where hogs will naturally be near a stream, wallow or trail.

You'll also want a good hunting light to shine on the feeder. Being able to light up the target will make all the difference in both how much enjoyment you'll get from the hunt and how accurate your shots are.

Get yourself a good hog hunting light to hunt at night with. A good feeder light will make those late night and early evening shots much easier to make. Also, you can help attract hogs to your feeder by adding sweetness to it. Any sort of sweet, fruit-flavored powdered drink mix will work as long as you can smell it when you drop it into the feeder and it smells sweet. This tends to attract the hogs.

As far as using an M1a for hog hunting, you'll find it's a bit heavier than some other hunting rifles you may be used to. But the biggest factor in making sure you have a successful hog hunt with your M1A is going to be your scope. You're going to want to be within 100 yards of the target for best results, so a scope with at least 7x magnification should be ideal. Also, the smaller the MOA the better so go with 2 over 4, for instance.

Neck and head shots are the best for bringing down a wild boar, and in order to get that precision shot you don't want to be too far away with a poor scope. Any shot you make typically in the head and above the shoulders of the hog should be a fast, fatal shot. Otherwise, there's the risk of only injuring the creature. Shoulder and front quarter shots are undesirable because of the animal's tough hide and fat, and lack of vital organs. You can avoid the bad shots by making sure you have a well-secured scope and the proper setting on your sight so that you can get a good aim at whatever yardage you're sitting away from the hog.

wildhog

You also don't want to get too close and alert your prey, because they can be dangerous. Standard .308 ammunition works well for hog hunting, if you go with the heavier bullets.

M1A Rifles Contest – September’s BSA Red Dot Scope Prize Not Claimed

October 16, 2009 by  
Filed under Contests

Hey Everyone. I wanted to get this post out today to let you guys know that last month's prize was not claimed. The winner never contacted me.

So this means I will select at random another winner from the M1A newsletter subscriber list for September's prize. I will be selecting and posting the winner Saturday October 24th,  around 1pm PST. Be sure to check back here and keep an eye out for a newsletter email.

Good luck to all!! Remember this is for the BSA Red Dot RD30 scope.

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